Monster potatoes at the market


This past Sunday my long time friend and co-worker Ron came up from the Delta, Utah area to hang out with me at the Wheeler Farm Market.   We worked together in Provo twenty years ago and we retired the same day last December.   He has been bragging to me for years about the big potatoes and carrots he grows on family property near Zions National Park.   Ron has been known to spin a yarn now and then so I was looking forward, with some skepticism, to seeing these giant potatoes.

When he arrived at my house Saturday night he told me that the potatoes were not as big as usual and the harvest was only about half of usual due to the weather this year.   So I thought this was the kink in the armor of his potato story and now the truth was going to come out.   Guess I was the one eating crow and the potatoes were huge.

He also had a few that would make any freak show proud.

The carrots were not unusually large but they were plentiful and very tasty.

Needless to say I sold one bat house and made arrangements to sell one bin which I delivered today while Ron nearly sold out of his veggies.   I hope he comes up again one more time this fall as we had a great time reminiscing about the good old days.

Earlier this year at the Wheeler Market a guy approached me about being a participant in the L3 Communications Green Day which was scheduled for September 26.  I took him up on his offer and was glad I did as this company in North Salt Lake has around 4000 employees.  I am grateful for the opportunity to talk to a ton of people about composting and sustainable living and I took my Rhode Island Red along for company.

After seeing Ron’s monster potatoes I decided to open a couple of my potato bins to see how I did this year.

Needless to say I was less than impressed with the first two bins that contained what sort of resembled a russet potato but smaller.

They are still mighty tasty though and as I planted several varieties of potatoes I still have the anticipation of seeing how the others did as well as the second planting of potatoes on my chicken pen rooftop garden.

I worked at the Westlake Garden for a couple of hours on Monday and Thursday this week and the production is still in full swing.  I picked a large sack of pole beans and a sack of swiss chard for the teachers and administrators.   The school staff picked the mini pumpkins which they are using for a school decoration contest.   The school’s family center has been actively picking the vegetables and they have been giving them to families in need.  The garden has produced a lot of food and I am happy we have been able to help the community with the garden bounty.

Fall is in the air and the season of plenty is coming to a close.  The work though is just beginning as to have a successful garden next year you have to start stock piling the leaves and other organic matter which will be used all next spring and summer to make compost.  Tonight my brother in law brought over ten bags of wood shavings from a couple of large tree stumps he had ground down.  I am always looking for organic matter for compost or mulch and this ground up material will be good mulch for my raspberries and strawberries.  I look forward to putting the garden to bed and to start hoarding as many bags of leaves as I can get my hands on.

I love this time of year.

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About urbancompostsystems

I am a retired law enforcement officer who is an avid gardener. I have a compost bin business named Urban Compost Systems. I believe strongly in the concept of growing healthy food and I utilize chickens and redworms in my "compost system". The only ingredients that I need from outside my system are leaves in the fall and some supplemental grass clippings from neighbors. I make hundreds of gallons of compost in my four bin system. I thoroughly enjoy the summer bounty I get from my yard and I take great pride in knowing that I am using my yardwaste to make healthy compost for my yard.
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